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Archive for May, 2011

TechBytes Episode 46 on Skype, Linux, and Android

TechBytes

Direct download as Ogg (1:03:54, 11.6 MB) | High-quality MP3 (23.2 MB) | Low-quality MP3 (7.3 MB)

Summary: Rusty, Gordon, Tim, and Roy meet again for a discussion about Skype, copyrights, PSN downtime, GNU/Linux, and Android

THE show will be released tomorrow (update yet to follow), but we release the show as soon as possible.

Today’s tracks are “Quanto Tempo” by Doces Cariocas, “Cos I said so” by Fangs, and “Iguana” by SambaDa (I named the last song incorrectly on the show). All are part of SXSW 2010 Showcasing Artists (get the torrents legally here). We hope you will join us for future shows and consider subscribing to the show via the RSS feed. You can also visit our archives for past shows. If you have an Identi.ca account, consider subscribing to TechBytes in order to keep up to date.

As embedded (HTML5):

Download:

Ogg Theora
(There is also an MP3 version)

TechBytes Episode 45: Skypocalypse

TechBytes

Direct download as Ogg (1:45:25, 21.1 MB) | High-quality MP3 (38.8 MB) | Low-quality MP3 (12.1 MB)

Summary: Tim and Roy have a loaded discussion about Skypocalypse, rogue PR agencies, and a variety of other topics regarding the growth of GNU/Linux and beyond

THIS show covers the Skype acquisition, Google’s GNU/Linux products, confirmed cases of AstroTurfing, and common FUD that resurfaces.

Feedback on the show can be posted in comments, in Identi.ca, and in the Techrights IRC channels (among other means of communication).

Today’s tracks are “El Camino” by No te va gustar, “Future Eyes” by Ear Pwr, and “Tokki no Rassha ” by Dolly (I made a mistake by introducing the song as “Dolly”, not the artist). We will try to include more music in the future as well, mainly from SXSW 2010 Showcasing Artists (get the torrents legally here). We hope you will join us for future shows and consider subscribing to the show via the RSS feed. You can also visit our archives for past shows. If you have an Identi.ca account, consider subscribing to TechBytes in order to keep up to date.

As embedded (HTML5):

Download:

Ogg Theora
(There is also an MP3 version)

Critique of Mobile Phones Culture

Tower

Mobile phones are a marvel of innovation and their small size is a testament to human achievement. But mobile phones as mere phones go a long way back, decades in fact. Their functionality today has hardly changed when it comes to core objectives like making and receiving calls. So how have people come to the point of treating them as accessories and status items in our increasingly superficial social system? Why are my colleagues advertising a phone brand in all their E-mails for example? Why are people without a phone (or a Facebook account for that matter) frowned upon? Must everyone be semi-detached to a phone? Is it a status symbol? Is that how it’s marketed? Wrist watches were like that sometimes, e.g. Rolex.

I personally no longer carry a mobile phone (or cellphone to Americans) for reasons that I explained a lot of times in many different places. I do, however, carry a PDA (it was even used to compose this post with a full-sized keyboard). It’s not something that I love to talk about as it is controversial and my view is an unpopular views. Usually I avoid naming the reasons in order to avoid a pointless conversation. But here is an attempt to cohesively explain some of the factors that led me to giving up mobile phones in 2003. I am unlikely to get one again as it is like an addiction in the sense that once one is purchased, it is hard to get out of the cycle, due to people expecting your number to work, the phone to always be switched on, and for you to be near a computer even when you are not. Moreover, there are strings like contracts, which give nothing other than more complications and paperwork. Getting a mobile phone is easy, but getting out/rid of it is the hard part, as I learned 8 years ago. Among the factors that cause discomfort, as mentioned earlier in other contexts, is the associated complications that resemble getting utility bills and having to challenge mistakes, set up direct debit, check billing addresses, handle repairs, etc. Another of course is the inability to distance oneself from work. People expect people with a mobile phone to be accessible anywhere, at any time. It is unreasonable given that the phone owner might not have Internet access at every moment of the day, which is crucial for some people to operate properly in a professional way. But then there are also the elephants in the room, which make people moody or confrontational when the subject is brought up. There are primarily two such elephants; the first is privacy and the second is health. Enough said, no? The industry which profits from mobile phone extravaganza funds research to deny the health implications of associated radiation, whereas almost any study not funded by those entities shows the opposite. It’s like the tobacco lobby back in the days. Please don’t attack the messengers just because the truth is not convenient. Also, do not be selective so as to fit one’s belief of choice; it’s like faith which overcomes reasoning, even confirmation bias. Regarding privacy, more people appear to be catching up with the problem, especially recently. Using triangulation it has always been possible for carriers to determine the position of the callers (geographically) and as time goes on and antennas density increases, the identification is further refined. In the past it was not as bad as before because carriers were not legally required and retain this information for the government. They are now, as friends who work for British telcos tell me with complete confidence. This is a serious step back which shows how hostile phones are becoming. This data is not there for the user, so it can mostly be used against the user. It never goes away, either. To make matters worse, even makers of the operating systems of the phone are now probing for one’s location. How can that ever be useful to the user? Marketing? To spin this attack on privacy as something positive people might say that it’s for one’s safety, in case someone gets lost/injured/abducted and becomes “missing”. In practice, however, It is rarely the case that the phone becomes a saviour unless a call is being made. So the privacy part of it (location recording with a long trail of history) is an entirely invalid point. Why retention?

The subject of privacy is better understood by those whose activities might be seen as subversive by some who themselves subvert society. The vigilant ones amongst us understand that privacy protects us from those who have too much power.

The one major circumstance where having a mobile phone would be invaluable is when trying to coordinate a meeting with someone out in town or some streets where a land line is not easily accessible. But that someone would have to be unreliable as people could arrange meetings and avoid being late long before mobile phones. Today’s generation got accustomed to the idea of using a phone to justify being late (people are still late, but they get reassurances and estimated times of arrival, which is not ideal either). If the train system was run like this, there would be considerable trouble.

The matter of fact is, a lot of people these days use their mobile phones for purposes they were not designed for, e.g. loud conversations about what’s available for lunch. It becomes an attention-seeking apparatus and less of a tool of necessity. People give away phones to workers or family in order for them to be contacted rather than in order for them to make contact and if they cannot be reached there is an unsubstantiated fear and paranoia. Rather than quell and suppress uncertainty (when someone can or cannot be reached) it just causes more anxiety.

Do you still carry a mobile phone? And if so, have you tried carrying none for a whole month as an experiment? It would probably not be an ideal experiment due to the tie-up or addiction mentioned at the start of this post. It’s a cyclic trap, more so than addictive computer games. Social interaction manifests peer pressure. The truth is, even without a mobile phone people can do all the same things; there are substitutes for everything and nothing ever rings to interrupt an epiphany.

Expressions Data in FRGC 2.0 (3-D)

I recently needed to gather 3-D data of different people’s faces, in order to perform experiments on these and test new algorithms that I had developed. The problem was, without some metadata regarding expressions, how might I find correct pairs suiting a particular criterion/ia? Two universities that I contacted had some data of this kind, but they were unwilling to share it (Open Data principles betrayed). So I had to do it myself using a dataset I mentioned here before [1, 2]. So far I have covered smiles and since it takes a lot of time to achieve this, I would like to share my work with those pursuing similar data.

To proactively remove allegations of the set being too easy to deal with (picky-ness in peer review), the most difficult partition when it comes to acquisition quality is taken. The figure below shows some examples of pairs that are being used after being selected as not many images contain expression variation. The selection process of very tedious as very few 3-D images exist with expressions in them, especially ones from the same person (required for consistent training assuming intra-subject residues are alike for common expressions).

Face expressions
Examples of the faces used tor training and recognition, with neutrals on the left and smiles on the right (note: this is just the texture of 3-D images)

About 5 hours were spent classifying the NIST datasets for future experiments. An initial subset of it is put in loader files. From the whole 3-D data of the Face Recognition Grand Challenge, one can only find a few hundreds of distinct individuals. Not all of them have an acquisition with a smile. I found just over 80 by manually browsing everything and some will be hard to work with due to obvious cases of degraded signal. The criteria was that all parts of the face (mouth upwards) must be visible and the expression one of happiness, not necessarily a smile.

The program works reasonably well (see the figure below) with new implementations of ICP (there are two main ones from my research group) and the new data which comprises 86 pairs, or 172 images in total.

Expressions data

Examples of the program with the new data and methods in place

Here is the statement for loading the pairs of expressions in GNU Octave or in MATLAB, in case someone needs a large pile of gigabytes of consistent expressions data.

    images_list={'neutral' 
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04471d273.abs' 


  ;'smile' 
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04471d271.abs' 


  ;'neutral' 
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04472d226.abs' 


  ;'smile' 
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04472d230.abs' 


  ;'neutral' 
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04473d185.abs' 


  ;'smile' 
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04473d193.abs' 


  ;'neutral' 
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04479d222.abs' 


  ;'smile' 
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04479d224.abs' 


  ;'neutral' 
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04484d189.abs' 


  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04484d191.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04485d290.abs'


  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04485d292.abs'

  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04488d286.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04488d288.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04495d313.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04495d317.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04496d246.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04496d250.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04502d60.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04502d58.abs'




































  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04505d218.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04505d224.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04507d309.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04507d305.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04509d276.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04509d282.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04508d83.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04508d85.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04511d178.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04511d176.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04514d326.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04514d328.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04513d303.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04513d309.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04530d321.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04530d323.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04519d204.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04519d210.abs'

  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04531d297.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04531d295.abs'





























  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04537d328.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04537d330.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04535d213.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04535d217.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04546d75.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04546d71.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04542d118.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04542d114.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04556d311.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04556d315.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04557d337.abs'


  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04557d339.abs'

  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04559d314.abs'



  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04559d320.abs'

  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04560d273.abs'


  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04560d275.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04569d288.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04569d286.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04577d290.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04577d292.abs'































  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04580d299.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04580d307.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04581d200.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04581d202.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04588d137.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04588d135.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04589d246.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04589d248.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04593d200.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04593d202.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04595d93.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04595d95.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04596d78.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04596d84.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04600d249.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04600d251.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04603d141.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04603d143.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04605d243.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04605d239.abs'








































  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04609d98.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04609d100.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04606d180.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04606d182.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04605d255.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04605d253.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04622d238.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04622d240.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04619d163.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04619d161.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04629d144.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04629d146.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04644d204.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04644d206.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04645d95.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04645d93.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04697d80.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04697d78.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04696d40.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04696d42.abs'











































  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04691d50.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04691d48.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04688d40.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04688d36.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04684d232.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04684d234.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04682d122.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04682d128.abs'




  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04675d251.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04675d253.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04673d188.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04673d190.abs'




  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04699d42.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04699d44.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04700d18.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04700d20.abs'




  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04703d46.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04703d42.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04704d22.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04704d18.abs'





























































  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04711d53.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04711d47.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04715d12.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04715d14.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04717d49.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04717d43.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04719d86.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04719d88.abs'




  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04721d48.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04721d46.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04728d44.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04728d42.abs'




  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04737d38.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04737d36.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04737d38.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04737d36.abs'




  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04749d80.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04749d82.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04750d54.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04750d56.abs'




























































  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04754d78.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04754d80.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04756d73.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04756d75.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04762d43.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04762d41.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04763d68.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04763d70.abs'




  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04766d24.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04766d30.abs'


  ;'neutral'  
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04767d38.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04767d36.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04768d76.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04768d74.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04773d84.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04773d78.abs'




  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04775d80.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04775d82.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04777d88.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04777d84.abs'


























































  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04779d52.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04779d48.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04805d60.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04805d62.abs'



  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04808d32.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04808d30.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04821d44.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04820d36.abs'




  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04836d47.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04836d49.abs'


  ;'neutral'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04853d50.abs'

  ;'smile'
  ;'~/NIST/FRGC-2.0-dist/nd1/Fall2003range/04853d48.abs'};

Later on I am going to publish all the code and about 100 pages of text. It needs tidying up first.

Goodbye, Skype

Skynet

I was never a major user of Skype. Heck, I only started using it on occasions around 2008, after I had repeatedly rejected invitations to join it. The reasons were multiple, e.g.:

  • It was non-standard (the protocols)
  • It was proprietary (it still is, but they openwash it for PR purposes)
  • It sucked on GNU/Linux
  • (Questionable: It offered no real privacy through decentralisation)

Now I have a fourth reason to abandon it altogether and move back to SIP, which sadly enough not many people are using as network effect matters. Microsoft has a very poor track record when it comes to privacy, retaining GNU/Linux support when acquiring software, and generally speaking, Microsoft is a convicted monopolist which continues to engage in crimes such as racketeering, bribery, and extreme market distortion.

Thank you, Skype. It was good while it lasted. And thank you, Microsoft, for giving me a reason to abandon this piece of malicious software and also encourage others to do the same, obviously to come over to SIP. Today I had a half-hour conversation over SIP (the codec is as good if not better than Skype’s). I also have a physical SIP phone connected to my hub. The future is SIP. Skype is going down the same path as Hotmail.

TechBytes Episode 44: Brandon Lozza Interview

TechBytes

Direct download as Ogg (1:36:14, 17.8 MB) | High-quality MP3 (34.4 MB) | Low-quality MP3 (11.0 MB)

Summary: Interview with Brandon Lozza about the release of Fedora 15, preceded by a conversation between Rusty, Gordon, Tim, and Roy

TODAY we are pleased to have Rusty, Gordon, and a Fedora ambassador who was speaking to us about the upcoming release, Fedora 15. It is the same ambassador whom [cref 41364 we last had on the show] just shortly after Fedora 14 had been finalised (I downloaded it and used at work shortly afterwards). He also hangs out in the Techrights IRC channels, so please consider popping in to say “hi”.

Brandon Lozza“Sei La” by Erika Machado (SXSW 2010 Showcasing Artists) and “This Town is Mine” by Deanmoore are included in today’s show. We hope you will join us for future shows and consider subscribing to the show via the RSS feed. You can also visit our archives for past shows. If you have an Identi.ca account, consider subscribing to TechBytes in order to keep up to date.

As embedded (HTML5):

Download:

Ogg Theora
(There is also an MP3 version)

TechBytes Video Episode #1 in Sound Only

TechBytes

Direct download as Ogg (0:58:29, 11.1 MB) | High-quality MP3 (20.3 MB)

Summary: An audio-only version of yesterday’s episode, hopefully with future recurrence of such a version for video shows

Yesterday’s [cref 48069 video episode] suffered some audio encoding issues, which led to loss of some information. It seemed reasonable to reach out for the audio dump and then put together the 3 parts with songs in between. The songs chosen for this episode are, in order of appearance, “Edge of My Seat” by Amber Rubarth, “Have This Drink” by Black Mike and Kemistry, and “Joyful Noise” by Breakestra (all from SXSW 2010).

“Thanks to the listeners/readers/viewers who provided advice and invited people to be guests.”The plan is, in general, to invite more guests to the show (like we originally did) and make that the key series of audio shows. Combinations/hybrids of audio and video can be put together separately and more quickly (less scheduling with guests along with other preparation are required), although we are still trying to resolve some technical difficulties with these. Thanks to the listeners/readers/viewers who provided advice and invited people to be guests. We have many in line now. One is scheduled for recording tonight.

We hope you will join us for future shows and consider subscribing to the show via the RSS feed. You can also visit our archives for past shows. If you have an Identi.ca account, consider subscribing to TechBytes in order to keep up to date.

As embedded (HTML5):

Download:

Ogg Theora
(There is also an MP3 version)

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Original styles created by Ian Main (all acknowledgements) • PHP scripts and styles later modified by Roy Schestowitz • Help yourself to a GPL'd copy
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