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Brexit Parties Rotting in the EU

Some flies on a bottle-

BREXIT fanatics have, as expected, voted for a “Leave” party. But the numbers are revealing. Not many people voted for such parties; as the Green Party’s Sian puts it this week (hours ago): “Giving the people the final say over the country’s direction is now clearly the only way forward, the way to draw a line under the Brexit chaos.” (Greens have more than doubled the number of MEPs)

Brexit is rottening; any party that backs it will perish. The hardcore Brexiters might be willing to vote for a cartoon party with no policies (other than “Leave the EU”), but Europe won’t take such a party seriously; it’s little more than a Trojan horse.

Will there be a general/snap election later this year? Some prominent people have called for it. In more than a week from now we’re left with no Prime Minister; surely people should get to actually elect who runs the country.

The Only Wikileaks ‘Collusion’ is a Trump/Pence Collusion to Have Julian Assange Arrested and Wikileaks Shut Down

Guardian
The people who proudly frame Assange, intentionally making claims they know to be false so as to ‘punish’ (or scare) Ecuadorian officials close to Assange

Moreno
Pence and Moreno agree to facilitate the extradition of the asylee

BOYCOTT the Guardian has been a thing or a meme or a hashtag for a number of years if not decades, but I only really started bycotting the publication (entirely) back in November after it had libeled Assange one more time — the last straw. It wasn’t the first time and it’s clear what they’re hoping to achieve, even at the expense of the publication’s (yes, as a whole) reputation.

I took a break from following and covering Assange affairs — and by extension Wikileaks — about a month ago. I changed my mind after the media had once again brought up Trump Jr. and Roger Stone, exploiting the fact that they were contacted/responded to around the time of the US election in 2016. It was a mistake to respond to them as those eager enough would distort any form of contact, establishing that as a “connection” or “collusion”. Each time RT or Sputnik contacted me (several times each) I did not even respond. They invited me to TV interviews, but I know how guilt by association works, so I very rarely take photos with anyone or appear on other people’s platforms (it gets one stigmatised).

At the moment there’s an unfortunately effective effort to isolate Wikileaks and discourage people from associating with it (let alone consider submitting leaks to it). But yet worse is the fact that Assange quite likely lives in the embassy (the Ecuadorian Embassy in London) on “borrowed time”. Seeing how the press constantly libels him for purely political purposes has taught me what I need to know about averting bad publicity.

I used to communicate with Julian Assange and I have a good/amicable relationship with his mother. She is a passionate supporter of her son’s work, but it breaks her heart to see him broken physical, emotionally and perhaps (ultimately) mentally.

When the media connects Wikileaks to Russia it conveniently overlooks all the Russia-hostile tweets from Wikileaks and even the Russian leaks. It likes to mention RT, noting that some series with Wikileaks staff in it was licensed to RT about a decade ago (it had appeared elsewhere too, not just RT). When the media connects Wikileaks to Trump it typically boils down to Trump operatives who falsely claimed to be associated with/connected to Assange. They’re liars, frauds, and crooks. Their appalling character is a liability to Wikileaks, but they enjoy all the media attention. It adds value to them.

My guess is that within a year or two there won’t be much left of Wikileaks (new material) and Assange will be somewhere in the US, likely behind bars because fair trial is not possible. Exposing the rich and powerful isn’t easy. Wikileaks will always be proof of that. It shows what happens when one becomes affective at lawfully challenging/exposing empire (nonviolently too).

When Those Who Expose Crimes Are Treated by the State Like the Criminals

Leonie Brinkema trial

Leonie Brinkema, appointed by Bill Clinton, works in a kangaroo court; it’s widely notorious for a rubberstamping-like behaviour in a variety of deeply political cases. “No one should have to face criminal charges for publishing truthful information,” said a letter to the editor yesterday, highlighting the nature of what some whistleblowers had done and got punished for. In exchange for them exposing crimes they got treated like criminals and this is more or less the job of Leonie Brinkema, protecting criminals by putting in prison those who spoke about these crimes. I don’t know Leonie Brinkema personally and it’s not even simply to find a simple photo of her face (drawings are out there and she looks a lot more furious in them).

It is expected that if (or when) Julian Assange gets ‘kidnapped’ and ‘shipped’ to the US Leonie Brinkema will be the sociopath who sentences him to death (or prison until death) for merely exposing the crimes of people like those who appointed her. What a crazy world we live in. They call it “justice”, but to those who set this court up it’s “just us”.

Seen at the Centre of Manchester This Month

brexit-liars

Political News Sources

Political news sources

It’s definitely not easy identifying accurate information — in that hypothetical journey to find sources of credible news. It’s very easy to find bogus news wrapped up in special effects with high entertainment value and a high budget intended to help sell something (products, war, etc.) rather than inform. The challenge is putting aside those. In fact, I keep deleting a lot of RSS feeds of sites that I no longer trust, either because they sold out to a political party, changed hands, or accepted some rich donor who is likely to change the agenda/tune. These things change over time. It happens. So lists can be out of date. The feeds at the top are some among those that survived scrutiny for years and can mostly be trusted as independent and worth following. The names above are abbreviated for personal reasons of convenience and ordering, but among them (less cryptic): EFF, ACLU, Alternet, Truthout, Common Dreams, Consortium News, CounterPunch, Craig Murray, Democracy Now, FAIR, Project Censored, The Intercept, NOAA, Open Democracy, Open Rights Group, John Pilger, Pirate Party, Propublica, TruthDig and We Meant Well. There are of course many others, but the above is already too much to exhaustively follow (I’m well behind on most of them, as the screenshot hints).

Militarisation and Privatisation of British Police

G4S and TAU in Manchester

The above photograph was taken by me less than a day ago. It was captured near Town Hall (Manchester). I could not help taking it because it was such a poetic illustration of what had gone wrong with UK policing, especially in recent years.

In British newspapers, not to mention blogs, one dominant theme this week is a massive round of layoffs, potentially affecting over 20,000 cops. It smacks of austerity. There are no police cutbacks, however, just privatisation. Tories want to do to the public sector, police included, what they have already done (to some degree) to the NHS. Enriching already-rich private companies like G4S and Serco seems to be the goal here.

For the uninitiated, TAU is like militarised police in Manchester (here they are beating up nonviolent teenagers), so seeing them parked right next to the G4S van was just priceless.

Singapore is Not a Success Story

Against the myth and against lionisation of autocrats like King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia or Lee Kuan Yew of Singapore

Last week the so-called founder of Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew, died. He did not build Singapore, it was workers (usually foreigners) who built Singapore, but he liked taking credit for everything, not just controlling everyone. He was somewhat of a tyrant, but nobody is allowed to say it. It’s not politically-correct to say it in the West and it is dangerous to say it if you live in Singapore, where trigger-happy censorship is common and people can be ‘disappeared’. Even in his so-called ‘retirement’, despite not being elected, Lee Kuan Yew continued to manage everything (albeit behind the scenes).

I have written dozens of things (maybe between 50 to 100 tweets for example) in various places online in an effort to debunk the myth, especially when the myth expanded upon the death of the founder. This baffled some who did not understand why I was chastising a country that I had only just returned from.

More than 2 years ago I spent a lot of time studying Singapore. I spent many hours in Google StreetView, Google Maps, etc. and I inquired about houses there (crazy prices) and routinely spoke to my sister in law who lives there. Later on I found some blogs which explained to me more about the hidden side of Singapore and then I learned the breaking story of Shane Todd with much interest. It seems likely that he was ‘suicided’. Since there is no free press in Singapore, don’t expect Singaporeans to know much about it (or to know the important facts about it).

Singapore, as it turns out, is somewhat of a sham. I saw the negative things when I was there; poverty, exploitation, you name it…

Singapore is not the success story that Western leaders try to tell us about as means of selling autocracy (decisions from above without consent). They want to justify autocracy in Western nations (it’s already happening under the auspices of corporations). Singapore is in many ways a failure with pressured children (low birth rates and super-high expectations) who turn suicidal rather early (like in South Korea or Japan) and it puts a deceiving face to the outside world by means of oppressive censorship (gagging or misinforming outsiders). Singapore has a high level of investment (maybe even debt) in a tourism ‘ghetto’ which it still invests a lot of money in. The priority is image, not happiness.

My wife and I stepped outside this tourism ‘ghetto’ in an effort to study the real Singapore — the one that anonymous blogs (afraid of their regime) write about. We saw unpleasant things and should have taken more photos to document them (but didn’t). People work hard in physical jobs at a very old age (maybe over 80), people sleeping on the floor, an enforcer with a Star Wars-inspired stick telling me not to eat peanuts outside the train… those are not the images Singapore wants you to see. But that’s Singapore; rock the boat a little or step out of the boundaries and you will see it.

Strictness over location of hotels in Singapore helps one understand how the founder of the country helps control the image so as to show all tourists only the ‘Disneyland’ but not slums. All hotels in Singapore (plenty of them) are mapped below, buffered by fancy malls, banks, and shallow entertainment for those who love consumerism.

singapore-hotels

Don’t fall for the myth of Singapore; sure, it’s nicer than China (never mind the vast wealth gap between rich and poor), but it is built by foreign ‘slaves’ (foreign workers who are not even protected by minimum wage laws and suffer from deadly, lax safety regulations) and it is even somewhat of a hellhole to many of the local residents who have Singaporean nationality and are forced to joint the Army (Singapore does a good job hiding its weapons apparatus, including that which exported poisons to Iraq). A lot of this military aspect of Singapore turned its business/industry into borderline inhumane, much like in Israel, which is also tiny and surrounded by hostile nations.

Maybe there are those who seek to justify oppressive authority in Singapore. But please, don’t use the ‘Singapore model’ to sell us the Singapore-inspired autocracy here in the West. The same can be said about Saudi Arabia, but that’s slightly older news (Abdullah’s death), except if we consider how it uses US-exported weapons to bomb the Hell out of Yemen right now.

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