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Friday, May 5th, 2023, 11:48 am

Sirius Might be Hiding Money Abroad (Deep Debt in the UK)

Internal documents show evidence

Sirius caricature/Sirius chart: The Sugar Daddy; Witch-hunter; the accomplice; several wives; mr. kink; fraudster in chief

Summary: The finances of Sirius are dodgy; with at least three different shells (in at least two countries) and an unknown number of non-disclosure agreements (NDAs), it’s hard to know where money comes from and where it is going to (even the company’s registered address isn’t authentic anymore)

AS noted this morning, the police is far too slow (if not reluctant) to investigate crimes of Sirius ‘Open Source’, so let’s examine the facts, based on the Sirius Business Case as it was presented 12 months ago.

Quite a few people were involved in the blunders and the crimes. We chose not to name them. Anyway, of note are the following parts:

Sirius income

Where did the surplus go? Another country? Seems plausible. There we go:

Sirius US

They don’t even mention the Gates Foundation because of the non-disclosure agreement, but it’s what likely drew the CEO to the US because, according to him, it was the “first Sirius US client” (strange, right?) and it was never mentioned anywhere in writing.

Several things are noteworthy and might be relevant to the police investigation. First, in March the CEO was publicly advertising that he had money (about 100,000 pounds per year to offer in salaries). So where does he hide the money? Where did that money come from? In the report he kept secret from us the finances in the US. Well, maybe he stashed it aside over the years and now he hides money in the US (from his ex-wives), who knows…

The only other possibility is that he fakes everything or that he advertises openings for which he cannot even pay a salary, which itself is illegal (that’s worse when viewed from clients’ perspective due to unmet SLAs).

In May last year the company said nothing about its “US” subsidiary having money or losing money. If it claims to still have money, then victims of the company’s theft may want to sue. Sadly for them, this past October the company changed the address of both UK ‘shells’ to a phony address and there’s no comment on the matter from the accountancy. This shell game won’t end well. With two grown up girls in the UK and two more young girls in the UK the CEO (two failed marriages) is probably chased for many other expenses. He is a financial fugitive in the US now. It’s not a pretty picture. Based on office gossip, there were also infidelity issues (hearsay but very likely).

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