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Wednesday, June 5th, 2024, 5:39 pm

Excess mortality across countries in the Western World since the COVID-19 pandemic: ‘Our World in Data’ estimates of January 2020 to December 2022

Description:

By definition, these serious adverse events lead to either death,

are life-threatening,

require inpatient (prolongation of) hospitalisation,

cause persistent/significant disability/incapacity,

concern a congenital anomaly/birth defect

or include a medically important event according to medical judgement

Covid vaccines may have helped fuel rise in excess deaths

Experts call for more research into side effects and possible links to mortality rates

www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2024/06/04/covid-vaccines…

medicalxpress.com/news/2024-06-high-excess-death-w…

Competing interests: None declared.

bmjpublichealth.bmj.com/content/2/1/e000282

Excess mortality has remained high in the Western World for three consecutive years, despite the implementation of containment measures and COVID-19 vaccines.

This raises serious concerns.

Government leaders and policymakers need to thoroughly investigate the underlying causes of persistent excess mortality.

Insight into excess death rates in years following WHO’s pandemic declaration is crucial for government leaders and policymakers to evaluate their health crisis policies.

This study explores excess mortality in the Western World from 2020 until 2022.

Methods

All-cause mortality reports, ‘Our World in Data’

47 western countries

Comparator

Historical death data in a country from 2015 until 2019

Total excess deaths, 1 January 2020 until 31 December 2022

3,098,456 from

Excess mortality 2021, 42 countries (89%)

Excess mortality 2022, 43 countries (91%)

Excess deaths

2020, 1,033,122 excess deaths (P-score 11.4%)

2021, 1,256,942 excess deaths (P-score 13.8%)

2022, 808,392 excess deaths (P-score 8.8%)

Conclusions

Excess mortality has remained high in the Western World for three consecutive years,

despite the implementation of containment measures and COVID-19 vaccines.

This raises serious concerns.

Government leaders and policymakers need to thoroughly investigate underlying causes of persistent excess mortality.

More information

The secondary analysis of the placebo-controlled, phase III randomised clinical trials of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines showed that the Pfizer trial had a 36% higher risk of serious adverse events in the vaccine group.

The authors of the secondary analysis point out that most of these serious adverse events concern common clinical conditions, for example, ischaemic stroke, acute coronary syndrome and brain haemorrhage. This commonality hinders clinical suspicion and consequently its detection as adverse vaccine reactions

These reactions included cardiovascular diseases,

coagulation, haemorrhages,

gastrointestinal events and thromboses.

Numerous studies reported that COVID-19 vaccination may induce myocarditis, pericarditis and autoimmune diseases.

Postmortem examinations have also ascribed myocarditis,

encephalitis, immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia,

intracranial haemorrhage and diffuse thrombosis to COVID-19 vaccinations.

pulmonary embolism, acute myocardial infarction, immune thrombocytopenia and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

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